Posted 1 year ago
this is so cool! Excited to do more!

this is so cool! Excited to do more!

Posted 1 year ago
this is so awesome! I
 cant wait for next 
ones!

this is so awesome! I
cant wait for next
ones!

Posted 1 year ago
omg this is so cool! Too excited to do more!

omg this is so cool! Too excited to do more!

Posted 1 year ago

This is so cool! Cant wait to do more!

Check it out

Posted 1 year ago

Sweeet this is so exciting! I cant wait for next ones!

Check it out

Posted 1 year ago

This is so exciting! I cant wait to do more! Check it out
Posted 1 year ago

omg this is so exciting! Excited for the next batch! Check it out
Posted 2 years ago

Newest Article Revised on examiner.com

Exercise enthusiasts run a whole gamut of folks: men, women, young, old, bodybuilder types, slender, athletic, out of shape, etc., and they all want to hit the machines. “In due time” will be my response.  It is important that you cultivate your “body awareness” before you utilize your muscles with the multitude of metal machines at your disposal.

What is “body awareness”? Simply put: Body Awareness is the state of being in control and knowledgeable of your exercising muscles. To be bodily aware is to understand your own body mechanics and its natural ranges of motions. This is most effectively achieved through proper technique using your own body weight or free-weights.

To note: This is not a slam-piece on machines.  Machine based exercises are excellent albeit readily interchangeable with free-weights for the body. But if you are not 100% aware of what your body is doing during a squat; then you wouldn’t want to be put on the seated leg press machine, because you won’t know if your knees are supposed to feel the way they do while you’re doing the motion.

Machines will not compromise with you on how you get from start to finish.  It doesn’t notice that your shoulders turn in the socket to get the chest press to the end position. It doesn’t notice that your back arcs in the seated leg press machine. It certainly doesn’t care, but we should.  The steps to gain your body awareness:

1. When you train with an instructor of merit, you do an exercise. You do the exercise, and ideally you should be instructed what muscles the exercise is working.

2. You are then ideally instructed to what you are doing wrong.

3. If you’re doing anything wrong, then you be instructed in what you should do (or don’t do) to fix it.

Once you’ve completed these steps: You have awareness of the exercise AND your body.


If you were properly taught a chest exercise and you go on the chest machine you will then know if you’re working the chest, or overworking another muscle in accessory to the chest. You will be aware of bad form, and only then the machine is good for you. It is not until you become aware of your body that you should acclimate yourself to a limited amount of the machinery in your local gym.

Posted 2 years ago

Five Exercises You May Be Doing Wrong (examiner.com)

This was written a few years ago, but updated with some studies and helpful links. I hope you enjoy!

http://www.examiner.com/article/five-exercises-you-may-be-doing-wrong?cid=db_articles

Posted 2 years ago

Baby on Board? Exercise (examiner.com)

My newest article from examiner.com

There’s really no mystery to whether or not a woman who is pregnant should consider exercise. Research shows conclusive evidence that exercising during all phases of pregnancy is beneficial to the mother’s and baby’s health. A word of caution: It is always a good idea for you to consult a physician before you should begin any exercise program, pregnant or not.  With only a few minor adjustments mom’s preexisting exercise program can be continued safely.

1. You should always be mindful of your inner body temperature as a large increase in body temperature is potentially harmful to the fetus in the first trimester. There are a lot of great thermometer accessories available to allow you to constantly monitor your internal body temperature during your workout.  Adequate hydration is a great thermal regulator as well, so drink those fluids!

2. At the beginning of the second trimester the pregnant exerciser should avoid lying prone or supine due to the fact that as the baby begins to grow pressure will be placed on major veins returning to the mother’s heart when lying flat on her back.  This undue strain can drop blood pressure and lead to serious fetal complications.

3. Though stretching is a great idea for mothers-to-be to perform, it is important to know that over stretching can lead to joint damage, due to the increased production of the {relaxin and oxytocine} hormones. These cause joints to be extra pliable, so be mindful.

With only the exception of high impact aerobic exercise, a pregnant woman may enjoy most of the other activities associated with exercise programs. If she found herself exercising using free weights, she might find herself continuing with training with careful attention to good body mechanics and focus on strengthening her pelvic floor muscles. If she decides she wants to continue a cardiovascular training program she may do so but being careful to lower her intensity level.  She should not be training to perform long-distance races, but working within the confines of her pre-existing cardiovascular training program would be ample exercise to promote a stronger cardiovascular system. As earlier stated, stretching is a fine activity for the pregnant woman to undergo. Some professionals have developed yoga programs for the expectant mother in order to facilitate strengthening of the pelvic floor and abdominal wall. There are many resources for the expectant mother to peruse in order to best tailor a specific workout program to suit her needs.

One final word of warning: there are a few very important warning signs for the mother to be to look for during an exercise program. These being:

Vaginal bleeding

Cervical discharge

Shortness of breath upon cessation of exercise

Swollen/ painful calves, (a sign of a blood clot)

Very limited fetal movements, (though when the mother is most active the fetus is less active, it is important to know the difference between a less active fetus and a distressed fetus.)

All in all exercising during pregnancy is a great way for the mother to be to decrease her stress levels, increase healthy heart function,  and strengthen her body to begin preparation for childbirth.

Posted 2 years ago

Another Article poster at examiner.com

Thought you’d like to see.

Posted 2 years ago

It’s been a while, but I’m writing professionally for examiner.com

None of you owe me any more of your time. I just wanted to let you know I am a contributor for examiner.com.

In the past 6 months I was laid off from Bally Total Fitness after the LA Fitness acquisition; then re-hired through LA Fitness. I quit LA fitness because it was even MORE “sell, sell, sell” than I thought Bally Total Fitness could ever be.

I now work as a personal trainer in-home and part time as a Therapy Aide at a Philadelphia outpatient hospital.

Since there are literally NO prestigious gyms in the Delaware County, I need alternative ways to express my desire to help in the fitness industry. Hence: my desire to write professionally. 

One final note: I am going to be a father in 3 months! All extra income at this point is most welcome. All I ask is you check me out at examiner.com

It’s free to you, and the more volume I receive and subscribers I get equals more income for me.

I thank you all for reading up until now, and I will generate new content regularly plus update some of my personal favorite blogs from tumblr.

Be fit!

Posted 2 years ago
Hey Nick--you wrote that you were not a fan of stretching pre-run. I read this days after reading a study that said it was unnecessary. You recommend warm-up, but what do you do to warm up? My first block is a hill, I hit that light, then start moving when the street levels out. I'm 47, don't know if that makes much difference. I also run fasted--I'm fighting my last 8-10 lbs. is the best way to go about it?
ottocrash asked this

Hey there,

To answer your first question: Warming up is essentially your preparation to successfully complete a task. To warm up properly:

1. Localize the muscles to be worked.

2. Do movements at a light (20-30% intensity) until you feel your muscles fill with blood, or at the very least until movements become easier and more fluid. These movements can include: walking hip circles, ankle circles, trunk rotations, etc.

3. Increase intensity slowly for the first 5-10 minutes after warming up.

To answer your second question, I am not really a fan of fasted cardio. Unless you have a sensitive stomach and you become nauseated during runs I would suggest eating up to 90 minutes pre run. Your performance will improve. Thanks for the questions!

Posted 2 years ago

Running outside in the winter… NOT a fan.

I was on my way to the gym today, and I saw 6 people running outside, (in PA, it’s about 20 degrees outside). They all donned sweat pants, shirts, hats, gloves, and some had scarfs. Despite all this winter gear, the 6 of them had one area that was NOT covered which should have been: their mouths and noses.

Of course, they would suffocate due to lack of circulating air. But obviously their health isn’t of much concern.


Advocates of running outdoors in the winter always say: “It’s a mental workout more than it is a physical one”, and to that I say: “Try running in 100 degree weather, THAT is way more of a mental feat than running in the cold, plus I don’t risk the chances of pneumonia. And yes I am aware that there are dehydration risks associated with hot climate running, so of course it’s not a recommended long term program. I used it merely to illustrate my point.

Another problem with winter running is the myth that you don’t worry about body regulating heat (over-heating) in a winter run. This.Is.Not.The.Case. The reality is that sweating is an EXTERNAL means of regulating the body temperature. However, since the winter runner has thoughtfully wrapped themselves in five layers of clothing, the reality is that overheating is actually more likely than not. Sweat works by evaporating off the skin once the heat becomes too great, this is what cools the body off. However the clothing prevents this evaporation from happening. (And I’m not going to go into the obvious application of using “thermal” clothing.)

Here’s the most sinister problem with winter running, which I had alluded to earlier in the post: Cold air inhalation in the warm, moist recesses of your lungs.

Science says that hot air+cold air= moisture. This is true, especially in your lungs.The implications? We have to consider that during bouts of extreme stress, the immune system is compromised to regulate normal body functions (core temperature), now you’ve exacerbated the issue with added moisture and constriction of alveolar sacs in the lungs. This is a recipe for pneumonia if I’ve ever heard of one.

But if we can talk muscular issues: now running under normal circumstances usually require a warm-up of some sort. Now my readers know I’m not a fan of stretching pre-runs, but more of a dynamic sort of warm-up. Why do we warm up? To promote blood flood and acclimate the muscles, joints, tendons and ligaments for the exercise ahead. However, being LITERALLY cold will cause your “warm up” to take longer than normal, hence increasing the likelihood of injury on a muscular level.

One final caution. It’s winter, it’s icy. It’s more than likely going to be slippery, and more than likely darker than normal in the afternoon. IT’S JUST NOT SAFE! Get a gym membership, buy a treadmill. There are better and safer ways to go running outside.

I am welcoming feedback.

Do you run outside? Would you consider my warnings unnecessary?

Posted 2 years ago

What’s your favorite workout?

Which day of the gym going week is your favorite? Just curious to know what your trend is. Any reason is a good reason to go, share if you dare!